Changing landscapes

Science and technology are major factors in shaping tomorrow’s society. Research and innovation are keys in meeting the ‘Grand Challenges’ facing Europe. These range from food security to energy supply. The medical challenges are as diverse as healthy ageing to mobility.

There is a growing need for independent science journalism, to interpret, explain and comment on the results of scientific and technological research.
It is also essential to provide the public and its policy makers with the information and evidence for in-depth scrutiny to be able to call science and technology to account.
A central capstone in a democratic society.

The pressure on scientists to publish or perish and the growing entanglement of science and business can create perverse incentives, which can lead to exaggerated promises, sloppy research and sometimes even fraud.
Science no longer seems to be the disinterested partner in the search for truth, if it ever was.

Thanks to Internet, science journalists work in a changing landscape as well.
They are no longer the single source of information for the general audience.
With blogging scientists and public relation and public information officers disseminating free copy and free footage their role is growing as curators and experts who can offer their audiences different perspectives on science and technology.

     There is a growing need for independent science journalism to interpret, explain and comment on the results of scientific and technological research.

 

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